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Computer programming is a reference to the process of creating an executable computer application to accomplish a specific computing task.

Computer programming is accomplished through the use of programming languages, resulting in a set of instructions designed to render the desired output, whatever it may be.

A person who has a working knowledge of a programming language is known as a programmer. Using the programming language, the set of instructions that a programmer would develop for the computer is known as a program. Each program is designed according to a set of requirements that might be better met with one language rather than another.

A wide range of programming languages are available. Some programmers are fluent in just one of these languages, while others are more versatile.

Each programming language has its own characteristics, which are of significance to programmers. Most programmers prefer a language that will allow them to write simple, clear, and concise programs. Some languages are simple enough that people can learn them by themselves. The graphical user interface of the language should be user-friendly and intuitive. In most cases, it is best to use a platform-independent language, one that can develop programs that can be used on a variety of computer systems, such as Windows, macOS, and Linux. Additionally, a programming language will build programs that make efficient use of memory and other resources. The tools needed for development, testing, and debugging should be incorporated into a single environment known as an integrated development environment (IDE), which keeps everything neat and in its place.

Of course, most people aren't going to take the time to learn a programming language that isn't regularly updated. Given that the computer environment changes rapidly, programming languages should be regularly updated.

Many programming languages are built for a specific purpose, while others can be used to build programs for a wide range of purposes.

Computers only recognize instructions that are given in binary language, which is not something that the typical computer user would be able to accomplish. Instead, programmers use languages that they have learned to understand to write programs which are converted to a language that can be understood by the computer. This is normally accomplished through a compiler, which is a computer program that translates computer code is written in one programming language (source), which the programmer understands, into another programming language (target), which is understood by the computer.

The first type of programming languages were actually written in binary form, which could be read directly by computers. The problem with this was the length of time that it took someone to learn to do this, and then to do it.

The second-generation of programming was known as assembly language programming, which was somewhat easier to learn, but it still required the programmer to understand the underlying architecture of the machine it was going to be run on.

The first popular high-level programming language was FORTRAN. Developed by IBM, FORTRAN created programs that could be run on the world's fastest supercomputers at the time.

From the 1960s to the 1970s, several low-level programming languages were developed, including APL, ALGOL, Lisp, Simula, and C. Next came a string of object-oriented programming languages, such as C++. Perl was one of the first languages used for building dynamic websites.

The fourth-generation of programming languages supported database management, report generation, mathematical optimization, GUI development, and web development. These included Visual Foxpro, PowerBuilder, and Uniface.

Fifth-level programming languages also included Perl, as well as Python, Ruby, SQL, and MatLab. These languages included visual tools to help develop a program.

The longevity of any one language depended on how well it fulfilled a purpose. Some older languages are still in development, and in use, such as C and C++

Today, there are Serverless programming languages, which don't require any infrastructure to run the program. All of the code is designed to run on a serverless cloud platform.

Several programming languages are in existence. Some of the more popular ones include C, C#, Java, JavaScript, Python, Angular JS, PHP, and Ruby. Each programming language has its own structure and constructs. Program developers ensure that they learn the appropriate language constructs to develop whatever program they need and that they choose the language that can create the necessary program.

Topics related to programming and programming languages are the focus of this category. These may include programming languages, compilers, development tools, tutorials, and forums.

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